53. International Winter Meeting on Nuclear Physics

Europe/Berlin
Bormio, Italy

Bormio, Italy

Concettina Sfienti (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz) , Laura Fabbietti (excellence cluster 'universe')
Description
Long-standing conference bringing together researchers and students from various fields of subatomic physics. The conference location is Bormio, a beautiful mountain resort in the Italian Alps.
    • 08:00 09:00
      Pre Conference School

      Lecture at the 3rd Pre Conference School

      • 08:00
        Hadron Physics: Selected Topics 20m
        Speaker: Prof. Concettina Sfienti (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz)
        Slides
      • 08:20
        Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics: Selected Topics 20m
        Speaker: Dr Pierre Capel (Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB))
        Slides
      • 08:40
        Heavy Ion Reactions: Selected Topics 20m
        Speaker: Prof. Laura Fabbietti (excellence cluster 'universe')
        Slides
    • 09:00 13:00
      Monday Morning
      • 09:00
        Welcome 10m
      • 09:10
        The Neutron Star Mass-Radius Relationship and the Dense Matter Equation of State 40m
        Neutron stars -- the densest objects in the universe -- are supported against gravitational collapse by pressure arising from the dense matter equation of state (dEOS) -- the pressure as a function of density, at and above nuclear densities. The dEOS arises from fundamental interactions, and so is of fundamental interest -- in much the same way that the ideal gas law was of interest arising from atomic gas theory at the dawn of thermodynamics; yet predicting the dEOS is fraught with uncertainty in the physics, as well as in the calculational approximations necessary to undertake what would otherwise be intractable. But, with a dEOS specified, the mass-radius relationship for neutron stars can be easily calculated; inversely, in the absence of a dEOS, measurements of the neutron star mass-radius relationship constrain the dEOS. I will review astrophysical observational results, from X-ray spectroscopy of neutron stars, and point toward how these results can be used to infer the form of the dEOS.
        Speaker: Prof. Robert Rutledge
        Slides
      • 09:50
        Newest Results and Future Perspectives of the Parity Violation Experiments 40m
        Newest Results and Future Perspectives of the Parity Violation Experiments
        Speaker: Prof. Frank Maas (Univ. Mainz)
        Slides
      • 10:30
        Coffee Break 30m
      • 11:00
        The latest results from the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station 40m
        The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a precision large-acceptance high energy particle detector which was successfully deployed in 2011 on the International Space Station (ISS) where it will operate for the next decades. Among the physics objectives of AMS are a search for the understanding of Dark Matter, Antimatter, the origin of cosmic rays and the exploration of new physics phenomena. An overview of the performance of the AMS-02 detector as well as the results based on data collected during the first four years of operations in space will be presented.
        Speaker: Dr Maura Graziani (CERN)
        Slides
      • 11:40
        Status and Physics of Belle II 40m
        Status and Physics of Belle II
        Speaker: Dr Soeren Lange (Univ Giessen)
        Slides
    • 17:00 19:00
      Monday Afternoon
      • 17:03
        Cross section measurements of the elastic electron - deuteron scattering at MAMI 3m
        The electromagnetic form factors of light nuclei provide a sensitive test of our understanding of nuclei. The deuteron in particular, as the only bound two-nucleon system, is a fundamental system that has received extensive attention in the past, by both theory and experiment. Because the deuteron has spin one, three form factors are needed to fully describe the electromagnetic structure of the deuteron. Especially the deuteron charge radius is a favourite observable to compare experiment and calculation. Recently, an extensive measurement campaign has been performed at MAMI (Mainzer Microtron) to determine the deuteron charge radius using elastic electron scattering - with the aim to halve the error compared to previous such experiments. The experiment took place at the 3-spectrometer facility of the A1-collaboration. Cross section measurements of the elastic electron-deuteron scattering have been performed for 180 different kinematic settings in the low momentum transfer region. From these, the charge form factor can precisely be determined. Fitting the form factor with an appropiate fit function, the radius can then be determined from the slope at zero momentum transfer. The determined radius could then be used as a counterweight to the value obtained from the advanced atomic Lamb shift measurements, thus providing additional insight to the proton radius puzzle.
        Speaker: Yvonne Kohl (Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Kernphysik)
        Slides
      • 17:06
        Study of direct photon production at PANDA experiment. 3m
        The modeling of direct photons production in collisions of antiproton beam with the proton target "p pbar --> gamma + X" is done for the beam energy E_{beam} = 15 GeV using the simulation with PYTHIA6.4 generator and PandaRoot package. Our modeling is performed using two subprocesses: a) quark-antiquark annihilation into a photon and a gluon and b) of gluon-quark scattering leading to a photon emission. The big potential of these processes for study of proton structure functions, especially the gluon contribution, at the region of the low Q^2 which is not yet studied, is shown. The distributions of the set of kinematic variables which are useful to get the information about proton structure in the available kinematic region are performed. The background contributions of fake photons in signal events, which can appear from decays of produced hadrons, as well as contribution caused by the background minimum-bias events and other QCD processes, are estimated. The set of cuts which can be useful for separation of signal events containing the direct photons from background ones is proposed.
        Speaker: Dr Anna Skachkova (PhD research fellow)
        Slides
      • 17:12
        Simulation of Hadronic Triangular Flow in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions 3m
        Relativistic collisions of heavy ions produce a hot and dense matter similar to what existed in primordial Universe - the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The hadronic collective flow was found to be one of the most pronounced signatures of the QGP. Comparison of experimental data at RHIC energies with different hydrodynamical models revealed that the produced matter is not an ideal gas of quarks and gluons but rather a low viscous liquid. Hydrodynamical calculations have also shown that the spatial anisotropy of the initial overlap zone of the nucleus-nucleus collisions is transferred into the final state momentum anisotropic flow. The invariant differential cross section can be expanded into a Fourier series over the azimuthal angle, with flow harmonics figuring as Fourier coefficients. At high energies the elliptic flow, defined by the second Fourier coefficient $v_2$, dominates the Fourier expansion for semi-peripheral and peripheral collisions. In central collisions the contribution of the third component $v_3$ becomes more pronounced due to the spatial initial state fluctuations. Study of triangular flow in Pb+Pb collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76 \textup{ TeV}$ and in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 \textup{ GeV}$ was performed using HYDJET++ Monte Carlo model. HYDJET++ combines a parametrized hydrodynamics for soft part of spectra with a microscopic jet quenching generator for hard and semi-hard collisions, giving a realistic prediction for different hadron species, such as $p$, $\pi$, $K$ or $\Lambda$. The model also enables study of influence of final-state interactions on flow of created hadrons. The interplay between jet physics and soft hydrodynamics, as well as the influence of the resonance decays on the triangular flow in AA collisions at RHIC and LHC were studied. Reasons for violation of number-of-constituent-quark scaling at LHC will be discussed.
        Speaker: Ms Jana Crkovska (Czech Technical University in Prague)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Neutron skin studies in heavy nuclei with coherent π0 photo-production 3m
        The charge distribution of nuclei is known with very high accuracy, i.e. in electron scattering experiments, conversely, the mass distribution is experimentally less accessible and therefore less precisely known. An accurate determination of the neutron density distribution is of particular interest. Especially in nuclei with N >> Z, a strong neutron skin is expected, since the excess neutrons are pushed outwards against surface tension by the coulomb forces. With the precise experimental determination of the neutron skin thickness essential constraints for the nuclear equation of state (EOS) can be provided and thus allowing to draw conclusions on the size of neutron stars. The method of coherent π0 photoproduction, A (γ, π0) A, provides a powerful tool to determine the mass distribution of various nuclei. In a novel experimental campaign carried out in 2012 within the A2 collaboration at the Mainz Microtron (MAMI), five nuclei have been measured: 58Ni, 116Sn, 120Sn, 124Sn, 208Pb. The tin targets are of special interest because most of the systematic errors due to pion-nucleon interaction can be neglected, and they allow a precise investigation along an isotopic chain. First results of these studies will be presented in this poster.
        Speaker: Maria Isabel Ferretti Bondy (Institut für Kernphysik - JGU Mainz)
        Slides
      • 17:21
        Exploring Lambda production in low-energy p-p reactions at HADES 3m
        The production of baryons at 3:5 GeV kinetic energy has been studied at HADES in elementary proton-proton and heavier proton-Niobium reactions. Resonant and non-resonant contributions to the total production spectrum have been considered also employing several exclusive analyses from the same reaction. In particular, the role played by intermediate resonances as , ++ or N to the inclusive production has been considered. In addition, it was shown that the phase-space production of pK+ channel does not describe the experimental data measured for this nal state and appropriate PartialWave Analysis (PWA) was carried out. In this poster we are presenting results of total inclusive analysis in com- parison to exclusive channels. Pinning down of all contributions will help in tuning transport models (GiBUU and UrQMD) as well will serve as important input to understand the production mechanism of in heavier Niobium sys- tems. Result of this model will also help to understand future HADES physics at SIS100 at FAIR.
        Speaker: Mr Rafal Lalik (TUM)
        Slides
      • 17:24
        Non-Photonic Electrons in STAR Experiment 3m
        Properties of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) are being studied in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). One of the experimental probes that enable us to reveal the properties of the hot and dense strongly interacting medium are heavy quarks, such as $c$ and $b$. These quarks are created during the early stages of heavy-ion collisions and therefore their production is not affected before the QGP phase. Non-Photonic Electrons (NPE) that originate from semileptonic decays of $D$ and $B$ mesons can serve as a good proxy for heavy flavor quarks. NPE in both p+p and Au+Au collisions are measured at RHIC. The p+p collisions are important as a baseline for the comparison with heavy-ion collisions and to test pQCD calculations. In Au+Au collisions the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ is measured, which is sensitive to the effects of QGP on heavy quarks. Also the elliptic flow $v_2$ is important to further study the interaction between the heavy quarks and the medium. In this talk measurements of NPE in p+p collisions at $\sqrt{s} = 200$ GeV in a wide transverse momentum range of $p_T = 0.5 - 12$ GeV/c will be presented. Also, the $R_{AA}$ of NPE in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV will be discussed. The dependence of NPE production and elliptic flow on the collision energy in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 39, 62.4$ and $200$ GeV will be shown. Finally, the status of the NPE analysis in U+U collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 193$ GeV will be presented.
        Speaker: Katarina Gajdosova (Czech Technical University in Prague)
        Slides
      • 17:27
        Shear viscosity $\eta$ to electric conductivity $\sigma_{el}$ ratio for the Quark-Gluon Plasma 3m
        Transport coefficients of strongly interacting matter are currently subject of intense studies due to their relevance for the characterization of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions (uRHIC). We discuss the connection between the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio, $\eta/s$, and the electric conductivity, $\sigma_{el}$: we find that a minimal eta/s is consistent with a low value of electric conductivity as measured in recent lattice QCD calculations. More generally we show that the ratio of $\eta/s$ over $\sigma_{el}/T$ supplies a measure of the quark to gluon scattering rates whose knowledge would allow to significantly advance in the understanding of the QGP phase.
        Speaker: Mr Armando Puglisi
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Isospin breaking effects in the leading hadronic contribution to the muon g-2 3m
        The functional approach of Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter Equations (DSE/BSE) allows us to investigate nonperturbative properties of QCD. We use this to study the Hadronic Vacuum Polarization contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, extending previous calculations by including isospin symmetry breaking.
        Speaker: Mr Jan Haas (Univ. Giessen)
        Slides
      • 17:33
        LUNA400 and LUNA-MV: present and future of Nuclear Astrophysics at LNGS 3m
        LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) is the only ion accelerator in the world operating underground. The measurements are presently performed with the 400 kV machine operating at the "Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso" (LNGS). This accelerator is mainly devoted to study reaction that regulate the hydrogen burning in stars and in the abundance of lighth isotopes produced during Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In the next future, the LNGS will host the LUNA-MV accelerator. The program of this new accelerator is mainly focused on the study of key reactions for late stellar evolution: s-process abundances, Helium burning, Carbon burning. In this presentation the present and future activity of LUNA is discussed, as well as the implications on astrophysics, cosmology and particle physics.
        Speaker: Dr Carlo Gustavino (INFN-Sezione di Roma)
        Slides
      • 17:36
        Measurement of the Analysing Power in Proton-Proton Elastic Scattering at Small Angles 3m
        The analysing power in proton-proton (pp) elastic scattering has been measured at small angles for six beam energies between 0.7 and 2.4 GeV using a polarised proton beam and unpolarised proton internal target at COSY-ANKE. The new experimental ANKE results close an important gap in the database of polarised pp elastic scattering. The analysing power results at 796 MeV agree very well with the corresponding data, which had been obtained in the various experiments around the world. However the ANKE data at the higher energies lie well above the predictions of the most recent published partial wave analysis solution by SAID group (SP07). An updated analysis from SAID, which uses the ANKE results together with the previously available data, leads to a new solution that describes the measurements much better. The small-angle range, accessible to ANKE and complementary to the EDDA angular range, seems to significantly influence some of the phases and inelasticities in the low-partial waves. This improves the phenomenological understanding of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction, which is not only important on its own, but also will have an impact on understanding of many other NN reactions.
        Speaker: Ms Zara Bagdasarian (Forschungszentrum Jülich)
        Slides
      • 17:39
        Two-photon exchange corrections in elastic electron-proton scattering 3m
        The measured value of the proton charge radius from the Lamb shift of energy levels in muonic hydrogen is in strong contradiction, by 7-8 standard deviations, with the value obtained with electronic hydrogen spectroscopy and the value extracted from the unpolarized electron-proton scattering data. The precise determination of the proton radius from scattering experiments requires the account of higher order corrections, among which two photon exchange (TPE) diagram gives the dominant contribution. The elastic contribution to TPE correction was studied with the fixed momentum transfer dispersion relations and compared to the hadronic model with off-shell photon-nucleon vertexes. The dispersion relations formalism with one subtraction was proposed. Theoretical predictions of TPE elastic contribution to the unpolarized elastic electron-proton scattering and polarization transfer observables in the low momentum transfer region were made. The TPE formalism was generalized to the case of massive leptons and the elastic contribution was evaluated in the hadronic model for the kinematics of upcoming muon-proton scattering experiment (MUSE). The recoil correction to the leading-Q2 term of TPE correction was found.
        Speaker: Mr Oleksandar Tomalak
        Slides
    • 09:00 13:10
      Tuesday Morning
      • 09:00
        From neutron-rich nuclei to matter in astrophysics 40m
        I will present results for the properties of neutron-rich nuclei from the oxygen to calcium isotopes based on two- and three-nucleon interactions, fit only to few-body systems and including estimates of the theoretical uncertainties. The same two- and three-nucleon interactions predict the properties of neutron-rich matter in astrophysical environments. I will discuss results for the equation of state, the properties of neutron stars, and for connections with the physics of neutron-rich nuclei.
        Speaker: Prof. Achim Schwenk (TU-Darmstadt)
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Relativistic nuclear collisions from RHIC to the LHC, the quark-gluon plasma, and QCD 40m
        Relativistic nuclear collisions from RHIC to the LHC, the quark-gluon plasma, and QCD
        Speaker: Prof. Peter Braun-Munziger (TU-Darmstadt)
        Slides
      • 10:20
        Coffee Break 30m
      • 10:50
        Status of the ELISE Project 30m
        Status of the ELISE Project
        Speaker: Dr Haik Simon (GSI)
        Slides
      • 11:20
        New Developments in Silicon Detectors 30m
        New Developments in Silicon Detectors
        Speaker: Dr Jelena Ninkovic (MPP)
        Slides
      • 11:50
        DIRECT REACTIONS WITH EXOTIC BEAMS AT LOW MOMENTUM TRANSFER: INVESTIGATIONS WITH STORED BEAMS AND WITH ACTIVE TARGETS 30m
        Light-ion induced direct reactions, like for example elastic and inelastic scattering, transfer-, charge exchange-, or knock out-reactions, have been proved in the past, for the case of stable nuclei, to be powerful tools for obtaining nuclear structure information, and were also applied within the last two decades for the investigation of exotic nuclei with radioactive beams in inverse kinematics. In particular, it turned out that in many cases essential nuclear structure information is deduced from high-resolution measurements at low momentum transfer. For the case of inverse kinematics experiments with radioactive beams such measurements can be performed either by using the experimental technique of active targets, or, with even higher luminosities, with stored radioactive beams. Within the EXL(1) project it was proposed to investigate direct reactions with radioactive beams, stored and cooled in a storage ring, interacting with thin internal targets. This technique enables high resolution measurements down to very low momentum transfer and provides a gain in luminosity from accumulation and recirculation of the radioactive beams. A brief overview on the research objectives, the technical concept and the present status of the EXL project, as well as on feasibility studies and first experiments performed or planned at the present ESR storage ring, paving the way towards the full EXL experiment at FAIR, will be presented. In particular, the results of a first experiment with stored radioactive 56Ni beam, where the nuclear matter distribution of the doubly magic 56Ni nucleus was investigated by elastic proton scattering, and a feasibility study on 58Ni(α,α`) inelastic scattering, where it was demonstrated that the Giant Monopole Resonance in 58Ni can be investigated by the present technique down to cm angles below 1 degree, will be discussed. As alternative method for low momentum transfer measurements, in particular for very short lived nuclei with lifetimes below 1 sec, the technique of active targets is well suited. An overview on recent results, obtained with the IKAR active target on matter distributions of halo nuclei, and on the future perspectives at FAIR will be presented. (1) EXL: EXotic nuclei studied in Light-ion induced reactions at the NESR storage ring
        Speaker: Prof. Peter Egelhof (GSI Darmstadt)
        Slides
    • 17:00 19:00
      Tuesday Afternoon
      • 17:00
        First observation of E1 transitions from the octupole band to the excited 0<sub>2</sub> <sup>+</sup> Pairing Isomer band in the rare earth nucleus <sup>154</sup>Dy 20m
        The N = 88 154Dy rare earth neutron rich nuclei offer an opportunity to study nuclear structure in the transitional region where the nuclear shape changes rapidly from vibrational to rotational motion. The question still remains whether at low spins the N=88 and 90 nuclei structure exhibits permanent octupole deformation [1] or aligned tidal wave octupole phonons [2]. The N = 88 isotones such as 154Dy88 have remarkable features; they are at a peak in the |M(E3)|2 transition strength of 01+ → 31- transitions for even-even nuclei as a function of neutron number [3]. This experimental evidence is consistent with the interpretation of an octupole vibration. The N = 88 isotones also have very strong E0 transitions from the band built on the 02+ states to the ground state bands [4,5]. The low spin states of 154Dy were studied with the AFRODITE spectrometer array equipped with 9 clover High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors at iThemba LABS, South Africa. The reaction 15564Gd91 (32He1, 4n) 15466Dy88 at 37.5MeV was used to populate these states. A first observation of enhanced E1 transitions in the transitional isotones 150Sm and 152Gd from the levels in the first excited 0+ band to the lowest negative parity band has been reported [3]. The results we report here are the first observation of enhanced E1 transitions from the low-lying negative parity band to the band built on the first excited 0+ state in 154Dy. These measurements on 154Dy extend the systematics on the relationship between the first excited positive parity pairing isomer band and the first excited negative parity band as the nuclear deformation decreases with increasing proton number. Reference [1] R. R. Chasman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 630 (1979). [2] S. Frauendorf, Phys. Rev. C77, 021304(R) (2008). [3] R. H. Spear and W. N. Catford, Phys. Rev. C41, R1351 (1990). [3] S. P. Bvumbi et al., Phys. Rev. C 87, 044333 (2013). [4] A. Passoja et al., J. Phys. G12, 1047 (1986) [5] J. L. Wood et al., Nucl. Phys. A651, 323 (1999)
        Speaker: Mr george lowani zimba (university of johannesburg)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Precision Hadron Spectroscopy at COMPASS 20m
        COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS, investigating the structure and the dynamics of hadrons. The experimental setup features a modern spectrometer with wide acceptance and precise momentum resolution for charged track reconstruction. Furthermore, particle identification and calorimetry make it an ideal tool to access a broad range of final states. In 2008 and 2009, a world leading data set was recorded with 190 GeV/c hadron beams impinging on a liquid hydrogen target. Precision studies of the light-quark meson spectrum are pursued by the means of partial-wave analysis. We will present selected results on exotic mesons and glueball candidates formed in diffractive dissociation and central production reactions.
        Speaker: Dr Alexander Austregesilo (Technische Universität München)
        Slides
      • 17:40
        Fast Frontend Electronics for high luminosity particle detectors 20m
        The future experiments of nuclear and particle physics are moving towards the high luminosity regime, in order to access suppressed processes like rare B decays and exotic charmonium resonances. In this scenario, high rate capability is a key requirement for electronics instrumentation, together with excellent timing resolutions for precise event reconstruction. The development of dedicated FrontEnd Electronics (FEE) for detectors has become increasingly challenging, as well as very demanding for costs and resources. The current trend in R&D is towards multipurpose FEE which can be easily adapted to a great variety of detectors, without impairing the required high performance. We report on high precision timing solutions based on customised FEE cards. The design utilises high-bandwidth pre-amplifiers and fast discriminators providing LVDS output signals, which can be directly fed into the TRBv3 readout using FPGA-TDCs with a precision better than 11 ps RMS. The discriminators also provide time-over-threshold information which can be used for charge measurements or walk corrections thus improving the obtainable timing resolution. Two types of cards were considered: one based on the NINO ASIC and the other, called PADIWA, on FPGA-based discriminators. Both types feature 16 channels per card. The performances of the cards were investigated for two extreme applications: single photon signals, typical of imaging Cherenkov detectors, and charged particle signals, arising from plastic scintillators arrays. High counting rates per channel of several hundred KHz were achieved, and a timing resolution of better than 100 ps could be obtained in a test experiment with the full readout chain.
        Speaker: Mr Matteo Cardinali (Helmholtz Institut Mainz)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        The Resistive-WELL detector: a compact spark-protected single amplification-stage MPGD 20m
        By combining in a unique approach the solutions and improvements realized in the last years in the Micro-pattern-gas-detector (MPGD) field, we have developed a novel detector architecture called Resistive-WELL (R-WELL): a compact spark-protected single amplification stage MPGD). The amplification stage of the detector, realized with a structure very similar to a GEM foil, is embedded through a resistive layer with the readout board. A cathode electrode, defining the gas conversion-drift gap, completes the detector mechanics. The new micro-structure has some characteristics in common with detectors developed by the end of the last century, such as CAT (Compter à Trous) and WELL. The goal is to realize a very compact MPGD structure, robust against discharges and exhibiting large gains, easy to build, cost effective and suitable for mass production by industry. Preliminary tests performed on small prototypes, with a resistivity of the resistive layer ranging from 100 MΩ/square to 1 GΩ/square have shown that the new structure exhibits a surprising gain of more than 6x10^3, a not negligible factor larger (5-6) with respect to a single-GEM detector, while the discharges are strongly suppressed thanks to the presence of the resistive layer. A rate capability of about 600 kHz/cm2 at a gain of 5000 has been measured. A distinctive advantage of the proposed technology is that the detector, composed by very few components (only a simple cathode electrode close the device), does not require for complex and time-consuming assembly procedures (neither stretching nor gluing): the R-WELL is definitely much simpler than many other existing MPGDs, such as GEMs or Micromegas. The novel detector will open the way to the instrumentation of large area fine tracking devices as well as huge calorimetric apparata at low cost and to effective applications beyond the research sector.
        Speaker: Dr Giovanni Bencivenni (LNF-INFN)
        Slides
      • 18:20
        From deep inside to outer space: exploring neutron skins 20m
        These days, neutron skin is one of the key words not only in nuclear physics but also in astrophysics. A variety of experimental techniques has been carried out over the last years to determine the neutron skin of heavy and medium nuclei. To overcome strong model dependencies a simultaneous combination of different techniques is favoured. Combining high precision measurements using parity violating electron scattering with the opportunity to measure a multitude of nuclei given by coherent pi0 photoproduction allows a systematic determination across the periodic table thus benchmarking modern calculation. In a first step the systematic investigation of 58Ni, 208Pb and three tin isotopes (116,120,124Sn) using the latter method has been realised at the Mainzer Microtron (MAMI, Mainz). For complement, two new measuring programs using parity violating electron scattering are scheduled: within the A1 collaboration at the existing accelerator facility as well as with the future accelerator MESA within the scope of the P2 collaboration. Advantaged by the solenoidal detector design, the parity-violating asymmetry for polarized electrons scattered on heavy nuclei can be determined with a 1% resolution. Status and prospects of the projects will be discussed.
        Speaker: Michaela Thiel (Institut fuer Kernphysik)
        Slides
      • 18:40
        Anisotropic flows and shear viscosity of the Quark-Gluon plasma within a transport approach. 20m
        In this talk we focus on the anisotropic flows produced in the ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. Recently it has been possible to measure the anisotropic flows event by event up to the 6-th harmonics. These observables are sensitive to the shear viscosity of the plasma. In this talk we discuss the build up of the elliptic flows and high order harmonics $v_n=<cos(n \phi)>$ within a transport approach at fixed shear viscosity to entropy density ratio $\eta/s$ and with initial state fluctuations. We discuss the effect of a temperature dependent $\eta/s$ on $v_n$ and their correlations with the initial eccentricities $\epsilon_n$ at RHIC energies for Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s}=200 \,GeV$ and LHC energies for $Pb+Pb$ collisions at $\sqrt{s}=2.76 \,TeV$.
        Speaker: Mr Salvatore Plumari (Univ. Catania)
        Slides
    • 09:00 12:30
      Wednesday Morning
      • 09:00
        Overview of the CMS Results 40m
        Overview of the CMS Results
        Speaker: Dr David D'Enterria (CERN)
        Slides
      • 09:40
        BESIII: the lastest data harvest 40m
        BESIII: the lastest data harvest
        Speaker: Prof. Wolfgang Gradl (Uni. Mainz)
        Slides
      • 10:20
        Coffee Break 30m
      • 10:50
        Beyond the LHC Accelerator 40m
        Beyond the LHC Accelerator
        Speaker: Dr Lyn Evans (CERN)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        Charm physics at hadron colliders and beyond 30m
        Charm physics at hadron colliders and beyond
        Speaker: Dr Alessandro Grelli (Univ. Utrecht)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Latest results from COMPASS 30m
        Latest results from COMPASS
        Speaker: Prof. Bernhard Ketzer (Uni. Bonn)
        Slides
    • 17:00 19:20
      Wednesday Afternoon
      • 17:00
        Measurements of Carbon ion fragmentation on a thin Carbon target by the FIRST collaboration at GSI. 20m
        The FIRST (Fragmentation of Ions Relevant for Space and Therapy) experiment, carried out at GSI laboratory, is designed and built by an international collaboration from France, Germany, Italy and Spain. The experiment aims to study the interactions of a 12C ion beam with 12C and Au nuclei, in particular to measure the double differential cross section related to the fragmentation of carbon ions. These data are relevant for applications in both tumor therapy and space radiation protection. The first set of data was taken in summer 2011 using, as projectiles, 12C ions of energy 400 MeV/u. The targets were of two types: carbon and gold, of thickness 8 mm and 0.5 mm respectively. About 24M events were collected using the carbon target and 4.5M events approximately were taken with the gold one. The 12C beam has been accelerated to the energy of 400 MeV/u through the heavy ion synchrotron, SIS, at GSI. The experimental setup consists of two parts: the forward region, dedicated to the measurement of the fragments emitted at low polar angle (<5°) with respect to the beam direction and the interaction region, whose detectors aim to measure the light fragments produced at higher angle (between 5° and 40°). The data collected in the forward angle region, using the 12C target, have been analyzed. The event reconstruction was performed with the help of FLUKA MC simulations. The results, in terms of differential cross sections as a function of angle and energy, will be presented here. Moreover they will be discussed in comparison with the most recent measurements in this field at different energies.
        Speaker: Ms Francesca Balestra (Politecnico di Torino and INFN -- Sezione di Torino)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Reconstruction of neutral mesons with the HADES detector 20m
        Lepton pairs emerging from decays of virtual photons represent promising probes of matter under extreme conditions. In the energy domain of 1 - 2 GeV per nucleon, the HADES experiment at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt studies di-electrons and strangeness production in various reactions, i.e. collisions of pions, protons, deuterons and heavy-ions with nuclei. An accurate determination of the medium radiation depends on a precise knowledge of the underlying hadronic cocktail composed of various sources contributing to the net spectra. Therefore, a measurement of the neutral meson yields together with the dileptons is crucial. In this contribution, the capability of HADES to detect $e^{+}e^{-}$ pairs from conversions of real photons will be demonstrated. We will present results from a two-photon analysis of Au+Au collisions at 1.23 GeV/u providing information on neutral $\pi^0$ and $\eta$ mesons. Supported by BMBF (06FY9100I and 06FY7114), HIC for FAIR, EMMI, GSI, HGS-Hire and H-QM
        Speaker: Ms Claudia Behnke (Uni Frankfurt)
        Slides
      • 17:40
        STAR's latest results on quarkonia production 20m
        The suppression of quarkonium production in high energy heavy-ion collisions relative to proton-proton collisions due to color screening was proposed as a signature of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation. Studies of quarkonium production in nuclear collisions can provide insight into the thermodynamic properties of the hot and dense medium created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. However, there are other effects that may affect the observed yields and complicate this simple picture, such as cold nuclear matter effects or recombination. Measurements of the quarkonium production and elliptic flow ($v_{2}$) in different colliding systems, centralities and collision energies may help to systematically understand their production mechanisms and interactions with nuclear matter. In this talk, recent STAR quarkonium measurements will be highlighted. We will present J/$\psi$ and $\Upsilon$ studies via the dielectron decay channel at various colliding systems and energies. Energy dependence of J/$\psi$ production in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV and in U+U collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 193 GeV will be shown. $\Upsilon$ production will be reported in $p+p$, $d+$Au and Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 200 and in U+U collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 193 GeV. We will also present J/$\psi$ $v_{2}$ results in Au+Au collisions at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 200 GeV and the first $\psi(2S)$ to J/$\psi$ ratio measurement in $p+p$ collisions at $\sqrt{s} =$ 500 GeV. Moreover, prospects of quarkonium measurements with the newly upgraded STAR detector will be reported.
        Speaker: Dr Barbara Trzeciak (Czech Technical University in Prague)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Experiments with a double solenoid system: Measurements of the 6He+p Resonant Scattering 20m
        The spectroscopy of light nuclei such as 6,7Li, and others is still a relatively unexplored field and the ability to produce these nuclei in reactions induced by exotic nuclei is motivating. In particular the 7Li has an excited state at 11.24MeV Jpi=3/2-T=3/2 which is the Isobaric Analog State of the 7He ground state. We present results of an experiment 6He+CH2 performed in the RIBRAS double solenoid system. The 6He secondary beam was produced by the 9Be(7Li,6He) reaction at incident 7Li energy of 24MeV. A thick 12mg/cm2 CH2 foil was used as a secondary target and as absorber in the midway scattering chamber between the two solenoids. We observed the protons, deuterons, tritons and alpha particles produced in reactions of the 6He beam and the CH2 target. Measurements of the elastic scattering p(6He,p) have been performed at three different angles, namely 0, 20, and 25 degrees in the laboratory system, to observe states of the 7Li around excitation energies of E*7Li=10.4-11.8MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for those angles which correspond to 180, 140, and 130 degrees in the center of mass system. We have fitted those excitation functions using the Breit-Wigner function. We also compare the obtained excitation functions with predictions of the R-matrix calculations.
        Speaker: Dr Ruben Pampa Condori (Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de São Paulo-Brazil)
        Slides
      • 18:20
        ATLAS studies of spectroscopy and B-decays 20m
        ATLAS has a wide programme to study the production cross section and decay properties of particles with beauty, as well as charmonium and bottomonium states. This presentation will cover the latest ATLAS results, including searches for excited b-hadrons, new decay modes of b-hadrons, indirect New Physics searches in rare B-hadron decays, as well as sthe study of mixing and CP violation in the Bs system and parity violating asymmetry parameter alpha_b in Lambda_b -> Lambda J/psi decays. We will also review the results in the domain of charmonium production, including J/psi, psi(2s) and chi_c states, associated vector boson + J/psi production and search for hidden-beauty state Xb, the bottomonium counterpart of X(3876) in the Upsilon pi pi channel.
        Speaker: Dolezal Zdenek
        Slides
      • 18:40
        Structure of light hypernuclei in the framework of Fermionic Molecular Dynamics 20m
        The structure of light hypernuclei is an object of considerable interest as it's study provides important information about the form and properties of the Y-N interaction. Moreover, modifications of the nuclear core including possible formation of clusters inside light hypernuclei could bring deeper insight in the situation when the amount of experimental scattering data describing Y-N interaction is very limited. In this work, we explore ground and excited states of light Lambda-hypernuclei. We calculate binding energies, Lambda separation energies and one-body densities of the s-shell hypernuclei. The attention is mainly paid to the effect of the presence of hyperon on the nuclear structure. In our approach we use Fermionic Molecular Dynamics approach as an efficient tool to describe cluster phenomena inside light nuclear systems. We perform time-independent variational calculations minimizing the binding energy of a particular hypernucleus. The proper antisymmetrization of the many-body wave function is ensured by the use of Slater determinants. The single particle states are represented by Gaussians wave packets followed by spin and isospin part. This provides us with a sufficiently flexible basis during the minimization. Results of our calculations including model dependence will be discussed.
        Speaker: Martin Schäfer (Nuclear Physics Institute, 250 68 Rez, Czech Republic)
        Slides
    • 09:00 12:40
      Thursday Morning
      • 09:00
        Dark Matter Search with CREST 40m
        Dark Matter Search with CREST
        Speaker: Dr Jean-Come Lanfranchi (TU-Muenchen)
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Super Heavy Elements 40m
        Super Heavy Elements
        Speaker: Dr Michael Block (GSI)
        Slides
      • 10:20
        Coffee Break 30m
      • 10:50
        Muons: civil applications 30m
        Cosmic radiation has been known since the first decades of the 20th century: it has been considered for many years, the best source of projectiles to investigate the core of matter, from nuclei to elementary particles. Nowadays, cosmic ray muons are very important in particle and nuclear physics, because they are used for detector testing and calibration, and for detector alignment in complex measurement apparatuses, thanks to their high penetration capability [1]. However, cosmic ray radiation has been already applied in fields beyond pure physics. The first use of these particles to inspect large volumes dates back to 1955, when the depth of rock above an underground tunnel was measured by E. P. George [2]. A more spectacular experiment took place in 1970, when Nobel Prize L. W. Alvarez [3] inspected the Chefren pyramid searching for hollow vaults (finding none!). In both cases muon absorption was used to estimate the thickness of the material crossed by cosmic-ray particles. Other applications such as inspection of volcanoes followed [4,5]. More recently, a novel muon tomography technique has been proposed [6], exploiting the multiple scattering through an object to generate its image. A prototype able to inspect volume of about 10-1 m3 provided the proof of principle that such technique can be used to scan large objects. The underlying physics of muon tomography is the multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) [7,8] of the muons crossing a given material. The first large-volume muon tomography prototype was constructed and operated at the INFN National Laboratory in Legnaro [9]. Now various research groups worldwide are developing this technique to address various needs and to propose civil applications, such as, among others, the detection of special nuclear materials in ports and borders ([10]), the detection of shielded radioactive sources hidden in scrap metal containers entering steel mills ([11], [12]) and the inspection of the inner part of a blust furnace ([13]). Furthermore, due to their property of crossing very thick materials, cosmic rays appear also to be a suitable tool for the realization of measurement systems, specially as a helpful alternative to traditional optical systems, when detectors are not mutually visible. After a preliminary study [14], a new case has been investigated, namely a stability monitoring system for historical buildings by means of cosmic ray tracking [15, 16]. An overview of the applications of the cosmic ray muons for civil usages, with special focus on the last development of the various techniques will be reported and presented. References [1] Aguilar-Benítez M et al 2002 Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 480 658 [2] E.P. George, Commonwealth Engineer, July 1, 1955, p. 455. [3] L.W. Alvarez, et al., Science 167 (1970) 832.
 [4] K. Nagamine, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 356 (1995) 585. [5] H. Tanaka, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 507 (2003) 657. [6] K.R. Borozdin, et al., Nature 422 (2003) 277. [7] G.Z. Moliere, Z. Naturforsch. 2a (1947) 133; G.Z. Moliere, Z. Naturforsch. 3a (1948) 78. [8] H.A. Bethe, Phys. Rev. 89 (1953) 1256. [9] S. Pesente et al., Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 604 (2009) 738–746 [10] http://www.decisionsciencescorp.com/ [11] G. Bonomi et al., International Journal of Modern Physics: Conference Series, 27 (2014) 1460157 [European Commission Mu-Steel project (RFCS - CT-2010-000033)] [12] S. Raggi et al., Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 409 (2013) 012046 [13] European Commission Mu-Blast project (RFCS-630643) [2014-2016]. [14] I. Bodini et al., G. Bonomi, D. Cambiaghi, A. Magalini and A. Zenoni, Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 (2007) 3537–3546 [15] A. Donzella, Il nuovo cimento, Vol. 37 C (2014) 223 [16] G. Bonomi et al., Proceedings of the “28th European Conference on Modelling and Simulation”, ISBN: 978-0-9564944-8-1
        Speaker: Germano Bonomi (Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering - University of Brescia)
        Slides
      • 11:20
        Hadron physics from Dyson-Schwinger equations 40m
        We summarise recent results on spectra and electromagnetic properties of ground and excited hadronic states determined in the framework of Dyson-Schwinger, Bethe-Salpeter and Faddeev-equations. We discuss the effects of dynamical quark mass generation and dynamically generated pion cloud contributions to the spectra of mesons and baryons. Also we plan to discuss first results for tetraquarks in the four-body framework.
        Speaker: Prof. Christian Fischer (JLU Giessen)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Looking the Universe from Deep Underground 30m
        The abundance of primordial light nuclei at the beginning of the Universe, during the so called Big Bang Nucleosynthesis era (BBN), can be estimated by means of Cosmology, Particle and Nuclear Physics. The first two give the environmental conditions and information about nucleons present at that time. The last one describes how those primordial nucleons fused themselves in order to produce the first light elements: helium, lithium and beryllium. The measurement of the nuclear fusion cross sections at energies of interest for BBN are thus very important. These cross sections are generally very low (from pb to fb and even smaller) and often impossible to be measured at laboratories on the Earth’s surface due to the presence of cosmic rays. The only possibility is going deep underground where this kind of background is suppressed. Today, the only facility in the world able to do this is LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics), located in the LNGS (Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy) laboratory. Thanks to the background suppression provided by about 1400 meters of rock and to the high current 400 kV accelerator, LUNA is able to investigate cross sections at energies of astrophysical interest (< 400 keV in the lab system), giving us the unique possibility to reproduce reactions that, in the past, produced the primordial elements now visible in astrophysical environments such as metal poor stars. In this talk an overview on nuclear astrophysics and BBN will be given, focusing on the latest measurements obtained at LUNA.
        Speaker: Dr Davide Trezzi (Università degli Studi di Milano / INFN)
        Slides
    • 17:00 19:20
      Thursday Afternoon
      • 17:00
        Measurements of W boson production in p-Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE 20m
        ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is designed and optimized to study ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, in which a hot and dense strongly-interacting medium is created. W bosons are produced in hard scattering processes occurring at the early stage of the collision and, since they are not affected by the strong interaction, they can be used as a benchmark for medium-induced effects. In proton-nucleus collisions the production of W bosons can be used to study the modification of Parton Distribution Functions in the nucleus and to test the validity of binary collision scaling. The latter is studied by measuring the yield of W bosons in different intervals of event activity. In ALICE, the production of W bosons is measured via the contribution of their muonic decays to the inclusive $p_{\rm T}$-differential muon yield reconstructed with the muon spectrometer at forward ($2.03 < \mathit{y}^{\mu}_{cms} < 3.53$) and backward rapidity ($-4.46< \mathit{y}^{\mu}_{cms} <-2.96$). The recent results from p--Pb collisions at $\sqrt {s_{\rm NN}}$ = 5.02 TeV will be presented and the measured cross sections will be compared to perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics calculations at next-to-leading order.
        Speaker: Mr Kgotlaesele Johnson Senosi (University of Cape Town and iThemba Laboratory of Accelerator Based Science)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Quasi-Free Scattering from Relativistic Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes 20m
        Single nucleon knockout and quasi-free scattering reactions are valuable tools to study single-particle properties of nuclei [1]. Particularly, it has been argued, that they can be used to study spectroscopic factors on an absolute scale [2]. Quenching of these spectroscopic factors as compared to shell-model predictions has been observed in nuclear knockout reactions [3]. While for stable isotopes these findings are in agreement with results obtained in quasi-free electron scattering [1,4], a surprisingly large dependancy of this quenching on the neutron-proton asymmetry has been observed, motivating further studies using quasi-free proton scattering. Quasi-free scattering of both stable and exotic light nuclei has been studied in inverse kinematics at GSI. While in a first protoype experiment a 12C beam was accelerated to 500AMeV by the SIS18 heavy ion synchrotron, in a second experiment mixed secondary beams created by impinging 40Ar on a production target at the entrance of the fragment separator FRS were used. In both cases, the incoming beam as well as all reaction products were detected in kinematically complete measurements at the R3B-LAND setup. Results for cross sections, spectroscopic factors and momentum distributions will be shown for different carbon and oxygen isotopes and compared to results obtained for knockout reactions as well as DWIA-calculations. Furthermore, excitation spectra of the reaction products will be discussed. [1] G. Jacob and Th. A. J. Maris Rev. Mod. Phys. 38 (1966) 121 [2] B. A. Brown et al., Phys. Rev. C 65 (2002) 061601 [3] A. Gade et al., Phys. Rev. C 77 (2008) 044306 [4] G. J. Kramer, H. P. Blok, and L. Lapikas, Nucl. Phys. A 679 (2001) 267 Supported by the BMBF, the State of Hesse (LOEWE Centre HIC for FAIR), and through the GSI-TU Darmstadt cooperation agreement.
        Speaker: Mr Matthias Holl (Technische Universität Darmstadt)
        Slides
      • 17:40
        Hadrons with c-s quark content: past, present and future 20m
        The sector of Charm and Charmonium physics is richer than expected respect to the potential model predictions, as new resonant states with quite unusual properties have been observed. Prominent examples are the X(3872) and the charged Zc(3900)+ in the Charmonium sector, and the Ds mesons below the DK threshold in the Charm sector. Strangeness seems a topic still to be exploited, in both Charm and Charmonium field. For example, the number of publications in the past 5 years in searching for hybrids in the invariant mass distribution of J/psiKK, in B decays and via 2-photon interactions, gives an idea of the renewed interest in this field, from theoretical and experimental point of view. However, composite systems of heavy-light quarks have gained the attention of the Charm-community since the discovery of the Ds(2317)+, that was unexpected found more than 100 MeV below the potential model predictions. As consequence, several theoretical interpretations have been proposed for these resonant states like hadro-charmonia, hybrids, tetraquarks and hadronic molecules. High quality calculations as well as measurements are compulsory for each state to allow one to decide among the various scenarios. The measurement of the width of narrow states is essential to discriminate among different theoretical approaches. We present a method to determinate the width of the Ds(2317)+ at the experiment PANDA, together with the status of our simulations and future perspectives, in relation with the recent measurements performed by LHCb and the performance obtained in this field at the B factories.
        Speaker: Dr Elisabetta Prencipe (IKP - Forschungszentrum Juelich)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        EndoTOFPET-US: an endoscopic Positron Emission Tomography detector for a novel multimodal medical imaging tool 20m
        The EndoTOFPET-US collaboration aims to integrate Time-Of-Flight PET with ultrasound endoscopy in a novel multimodal device, capable to support the development of new biomarkers for prostate and pancreatic tumors. The detector consists in two parts: a PET head mounted on an ultrasound probe and an external PET plate, placed outside the body in coincidence with the PET head. The gamma ray detection is performed by scintillating crystals with Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) readout. Analog SiPM are used in the external plate, while new dedicated multi-digital SiPM have been developed for the internal probe, which also involves other technological solutions due to the high level of miniaturization. The spatial resolution of 1 mm for the PET image requires small crystal size, and therefore high channel density. Moreover, the detector is designed to achieve an unprecedented Coincidence Time Resolution (CTR) of 200 ps FWHM, essential for effective background rejection. Compared to conventional PET scanner, the unusual asymmetric design requires a tracking system with a resolution better than 1 mm, and poses new issues for detector simulation. In addition, the image reconstruction has to cope with the limited field of view. The detector design and the characterization of single components are presented, as well as the results on the first integrated prototype.
        Speaker: Mr Daniele Cortinovis (DESY)
        Slides
      • 18:20
        Hadronic decays of the omega meson measured with WASA-at-COSY 20m
        Ongoing studies of the decays omega -> pi+ pi- pi0 and omega -> pi+ pi- will be presented. The data was collected by the WASA-at-COSY collaboration where the omega mesons were produced through the reaction p + d -> 3He + omega. The experiment allows for tagging of the recoil 3He and a full reconstruction of all decay particles. The decay mechanism of the omega -> pi+ pi- pi0 channel can be studied through a two dimensional distribution, called a Dalitz plot. The aim is to produce a high-statistics Dalitz plot, which will provide stringent test of theoretical predictions and in particular will increase understanding of three pion final state interactions. The isospin breaking omega -> pi+ pi- decay can give insight into the behaviour of the rho - omega mixing. This channel has been studied in e+ e- collisions where the interference has been conclusively shown as destructive. Only a few measurements with limited statistics exist for hadronic production of the omega meson. These measurements hint at a possible constructive interference. The aim of the present study is to investigate the structure of the omega -> pi+ pi- signal in proton deuteron collisions.
        Speaker: Ms Lena Heijkenskjöld (Uppsala University)
        Slides
      • 18:40
        Recent Results on Hard Probes of the Quark-Gluon Plasma with the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC 20m
        Jets provide a powerful tool for probing the dynamics of the quark-gluon plasma created in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC. The modification of high-pT parton showers as they propagate in the quark-gluon plasma, often referred to as "jet quenching", provides insight on the short-distance dynamics of the plasma. Jet quenching has been observed in a variety of single jet, dijet, and photon-jet measurements at the LHC as well as in measurements of modified production of charged-particle These results will be presented along with a survey of results of control measurements in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions including electroweak final states.
        Speaker: Dr Tomas Kosek (Charles University in Prague)
        Slides
    • 09:00 13:40
      Friday Morning
      • 09:00
        Overview of the ATLAS Results 40m
        Overview of the ATLAS Results
        Speaker: Dr Juergen Krosberg (Univ. Bonn)
        Slides
      • 09:40
        Overview of LHCb 40m
        Overview of LHCb
        Speaker: Dr Matthew William Kenzie (CERN)
        Slides
      • 10:20
        Coffee Break 30m
      • 10:50
        A New Hadron Spectroscopy 40m
        A number of candidate multiquark, quarkonium-like mesons, i.e., mesons with underlying substructures that are more complex than the quark-antiquark prescription that is in the commonly used textbooks, have been observed in e+e- meson factory and high-energy hadron collider experiments. Many of the most recently observed candidate states are electrically charged and have the same spin and parity, namely JP=1+. In this talk I will give an overview of the current experimental situation and identify patterns among the recently discovered JP=1+ states, compare these patterns with expectations from proposed theoretical models and suggest the existence of additional related states that might be accessible at current and future experiments.
        Speaker: Dr Stephen Lars Olsen (Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon KOREA)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        QCD-matter studies with ALICE at the LHC 30m
        A selection of results from the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC will be presented, with emphasis on soft physics observables. New insights into the relativistic heavy-ion collision dynamics and the nature of the matter created, emerging from the analysis of the Run 1 data, will be discussed.
        Speaker: Dariusz Miskowiec (GSI)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Low-mass dileptons: A thermometer for the hottest stuff in the universe 30m
        Speaker: Dr Torsten Dahms (Excellence CLuster Universe TUM)
        Slides
    • 17:00 19:00
      Friday Afternoon
      • 17:00
        A novel dual-mode tracking device for online dose monitoring in hadron therapy 20m
        Hadron therapy is a technique for cancer treatment that exploits ion beams (mostly protons and carbons). A critical issue is the monitoring accuracy of the dose released by the beam to the tumor and to the surrounding tissues. We present the design of a dual-tracking device capable of online dose monitor through the detection of prompt photons and charged particles produced by the interactions of the beam in the patient tissues. Both the neutral and charged emission shapes can be correlated with spatial dose release and the Bragg peak position. The device will be able to provide a fast response on the dose pattern. I will briefly review the measured flux and energy spectra for secondary particles produced by 12C beams at therapeutical energies impinging on PMMA phantoms and their relation with the Bragg peak. I will then describe the dual mode dosimeter whose design has been optimized using Monte Carlo simulations. The operation uses the information provided by 6 planes of scintillating fibers with orthogonal views followed by a plastic scintillator (electron absorber) and a small calorimeter made by a pixellated lyso crystal. A first tracker layer has already been assembled and the detector performances have been estimated with cosmic rays. The fiber system efficiency and cross-talk will be reviewed. A complete simulation and event reconstruction has been performed to determine the achievable spatial resolution. Charged particles are reconstructed using the scintillating planes and those identified by protons are back-traced to determine the point of origin. Prompt photons are reconstructed exploiting their Compton interactions by combining the spatial and energy measurements from the tracker for the electron and from the lyso for the photon. For a real hadrotherapeutic treatment the achievable resolution is of the order of ten (few) millimeters using the neutral (charged) component.
        Speaker: Dr Cecilia Voena (INFN Roma)
        Slides
      • 17:20
        Singly Cabibbo Suppressed Charm Decay : CP Violation, Branching Ratio Measurement, and Partial Wave Analysis 20m
        We will present a summary of the activity of the TU Munich's Belle and Belle II groups concerning the decay of charm mesons D+ and D0 into multiple hadrons. A summary of analytical techniques for the amplitude analysis of three- and four-pion final states will be presented.
        Speaker: Johannes Rauch
        Slides
      • 17:40
        Centrality dependence of charged jets in p-Pb collisions measured with the ALICE detector 20m
        Highly energetic jets are sensitive probes for the kinematics and the topology of nuclear collisions. Jets are collimated sprays of charged and neutral particles, which are produced in the fragmentation of hard scattered partons in an early stage of the collision. The measurement of jet spectra in p-Pb collisions provides an important way of quantifying the effects of cold nuclear matter in the initial state on jet production, fragmentation, and hadronization. Unlike in Pb-Pb collisions, strong hot nuclear matter effects - e.g. from quark-gluon plasma formation - are not expected to occur in p-Pb collisions. Hence, cold nuclear matter effects can be investigated in isolation. The impact of cold nuclear matter effects on charged jet spectra is expected to depend on the event centrality. Higher event centralities are principally connected to a higher probability for an interaction of proton and lead-nucleus and therefore also for a possible nuclear modification. For the extraction of a jet signal, the exact evaluation of the background density in the underlying event is an especially important ingredient. Besides the background energy density, also intra-event background fluctuations must be taken into account in p-Pb collisions. The finite resolution and detector efficiency is corrected for by using a full detector Monte Carlo simulation. The fully corrected charged jet spectra are obtained through applying an unfolding procedure. In this talk, centrality-dependent properties of charged jets in p-Pb measured by ALICE will be shown for the first time. The focus is on the nuclear modification factors and ratios connecting the central to the peripheral and minimum bias jets. Additionally, the jet radial structure is explored by comparing jet spectra reconstructed with different resolution parameters.
        Speaker: Ruediger Haake (University of Muenster)
        Slides
      • 18:00
        Concept of the $K_{S}^{0}$ rescue system for the Belle II PXD 20m
        The Belle II experiment at KEK in Tsukuba, Japan will perform studies with B mesons with a factor $\times 40$ increased luminosity compared to the Belle experiment. One of the main goals of Belle II is the search for physics beyond the Standard Model, for example in rare B meson decays described by with loop diagrams. Detecting $B$ mesons frequently involves the detection of $K_{S}^{0}$ with its displaced decay vertex. The innermost detector of Belle II is the DEPFET pixel detector (PXD) with an expected occupancy of $\leq 3\%$ due to high background. In order to reduce the data, only hits inside region-of-interests (ROIs) are read out. The ROIs are determined by extrapolation into the PXD region of tracks in the surrounding detector, the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), and the outer detectors. Thus every PXD hit of a particle, which does not create a valid track in the track finder, and subsequently no ROI, will not be recorded. Frequently pions originating from a (far off) secondary vertex of a $K_{S}^{0}$ decay do not create sufficient hits in the SVD. As a consequence, a significant amount of $K_{S}^{0}$ mesons will be lost. In this contribution, we present a concept for a the $K_{S}^{0}$ - rescue system. Here, we perform online tracking using six of the PXD and SVD layers to find the tracks of these pions, resulting in significantly improved $K_{S}^{0}$ reconstruction efficiency.
        Speaker: Mr Leonard Koch
        Slides
      • 18:20
        CP violation in B and D systems at LHCb 20m
        Slides
      • 18:40
        The Little Hagedorn That Could 20m
        The log-lin dependence of the hadronic density of states with mass is known as the Hagedorn. A similar dependence is observed, at energies a factor of one thousand lower,in most atomic nuclei. The latter behavior is due to a 1st order phase transition from a superfluid to an ideal gas of quasi particles. This transition is consistent with the BCS Hamiltonian treated within a microcanonical framework. Gap and gapless superfluidity is beautifully demonstrated in even even and odd A nuclei respectively. An extensive thermodynamical analysis of these systems will be presented. This Litte Hagedorn , so clearly identified experimentally, can offer some lessons to its big brother, the Hagedorn. The log-linear dependence of the hadronic spectrum is a textbook evidence of a 1st order phase transition. But, what are the two phases? What are the quasi particles created by the excitation, and how much entropy per quasi particle do they carry? Possible answers to this questions may be found in the difference between nucleonic and mesonic spectra.
        Speaker: Prof. Luciano Moretto (UCB and LBNL)
        Slides