26-28 September 2018
Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University
Europe/Berlin timezone

Understanding the structure of quantum field theories and their observational consequences beyond the realm of perturbation theory constitutes one of the central challenges in theoretical physics. Progress along this research frontier may be the key for answering fundamental questions related to the structure of space, time, and matter. Following the idea of “renormalizing the non-renormalizable”, this route may even allow for a unified description of all fundamental forces, including gravity, within the framework of renormalizable quantum field theories.

A central tool for exploring this essentially uncharted territory are functional methods based, e.g., on path integrals or functional renormalization group equations. This workshop will survey recent developments, flourishing from seminal contributions by Martin Reuter, and future opportunities in this field. The scientific focus will cover fundamental aspects and a discussion of possible quantum gravity signatures observable in particle physics, black holes, and cosmology. The goal is to develop new roadmaps for obtaining a description of our world valid on all scales and identify new connections between the fundamental descriptions and phenomenological consequences within the various approaches.

Invited Speakers:

Abhay Ashtekar Ennio Gozzi
Daniel Becker Renate Loll
Dario Benedetti Max Niedermaier
Alfio Bonanno Carlo Pagani
Steve Carlip Alessia Platania
Alessandro Codello Hartmann Römer
Bianca Dittrich Christof Wetterich
Walter Dittrich Andreas Wipf
Gerald Dunne  

Proceedings of the workshop will be published by universe.

Starts 26 Sep 2018 09:00
Ends 28 Sep 2018 18:00
Europe/Berlin
Mainz Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University
02.430
Staudingerweg 9 / 2nd floor, 55128 Mainz

Organized by Astrid Eichhorn (University of Heidelberg), Roberto Percacci (SISSA) and Frank Saueressig (Radboud University Nijmegen).


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